Difference between revisions of "Brno City Guide"

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(add more transportation info)
(add a bit of Czech)
 
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* Brno is well-connected to the rest of Europe via roads, buses, trains, and its own airport ([http://www.brno-airport.cz/ BRQ]). The closest international airports are Vienna ([https://www.viennaairport.com/ VIE]) and Prague ([https://www.prg.aero/ PRG]); [https://www.studentagency.eu/ Student Agency] and [https://www.flixbus.com/ FlixBus] provide bus service from either airport to Brno (be sure to select the airport stop).
 
* Brno is well-connected to the rest of Europe via roads, buses, trains, and its own airport ([http://www.brno-airport.cz/ BRQ]). The closest international airports are Vienna ([https://www.viennaairport.com/ VIE]) and Prague ([https://www.prg.aero/ PRG]); [https://www.studentagency.eu/ Student Agency] and [https://www.flixbus.com/ FlixBus] provide bus service from either airport to Brno (be sure to select the airport stop).
 
* Brno has a good public transportation system (trams and buses). Tickets are available at many hotels, newsstands, and vending machines along the routes. Tickets cover a certain amount of time (15 minutes, 60 minutes, etc.) rather than bus trips. The first time you use a ticket, insert it into a machine on the tram/bus which will stamp it with the current time, and the ticket is good for the purchased amount of time after that.
 
* Brno has a good public transportation system (trams and buses). Tickets are available at many hotels, newsstands, and vending machines along the routes. Tickets cover a certain amount of time (15 minutes, 60 minutes, etc.) rather than bus trips. The first time you use a ticket, insert it into a machine on the tram/bus which will stamp it with the current time, and the ticket is good for the purchased amount of time after that.
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== Survival Czech ==
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Many Czechs speak English, especially in hotels, restaurants, and downtown shops, so it's easy to get around even if you don't know any Czech. But if you want to know a smidgen, here are the three most important phrases:
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* [https://www.soundboard.com/sb/sound/144052 '''Dobrý den:'''] "Hello" (literally "good day", which can be used any daylight hours). Clerks at most shops will say this when you walk in, and it's polite to say it back. The Czech "r" is a [https://www.fluentin3months.com/roll-your-r/ rolling "r"], like in Spanish.
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* [https://www.soundboard.com/sb/sound/144058 '''Na shledanou:'''] "Goodbye." Said when leaving a shop. The Czech "sh" is an "s" or "z" sound followed by a guttural "h" sound (like German or Scottish "ch"), not the English "sh" sound. Czech "ou" is like "oh".
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* [https://forvo.com/phrase/nemluv%C3%ADm_%C4%8Desky/ '''Nemluvím česky:'''] "I don't speak Czech." You can use this in all other situations. :-) The second word is pronounced like "chess key".
  
 
[[Category:City Guides]]
 
[[Category:City Guides]]

Latest revision as of 19:40, 20 January 2020

Brno is the second-largest city in Czechia, with captivating architecture spanning back to the Middle Ages, and a variety of attractions.

  • Brno Wikipedia page
  • Brno tourism
  • Brno is well-connected to the rest of Europe via roads, buses, trains, and its own airport (BRQ). The closest international airports are Vienna (VIE) and Prague (PRG); Student Agency and FlixBus provide bus service from either airport to Brno (be sure to select the airport stop).
  • Brno has a good public transportation system (trams and buses). Tickets are available at many hotels, newsstands, and vending machines along the routes. Tickets cover a certain amount of time (15 minutes, 60 minutes, etc.) rather than bus trips. The first time you use a ticket, insert it into a machine on the tram/bus which will stamp it with the current time, and the ticket is good for the purchased amount of time after that.

Survival Czech

Many Czechs speak English, especially in hotels, restaurants, and downtown shops, so it's easy to get around even if you don't know any Czech. But if you want to know a smidgen, here are the three most important phrases:

  • Dobrý den: "Hello" (literally "good day", which can be used any daylight hours). Clerks at most shops will say this when you walk in, and it's polite to say it back. The Czech "r" is a rolling "r", like in Spanish.
  • Na shledanou: "Goodbye." Said when leaving a shop. The Czech "sh" is an "s" or "z" sound followed by a guttural "h" sound (like German or Scottish "ch"), not the English "sh" sound. Czech "ou" is like "oh".
  • Nemluvím česky: "I don't speak Czech." You can use this in all other situations. :-) The second word is pronounced like "chess key".